Want to add a little sex appeal into your singing? How about channeling your inner Marilyn Monroe or Eddie Vedder on stage? (Eddie = has SUCH a sexy voice in my opinion!! tee hee!)

In today’s vid I do an artist breakdown of Alice Fredenham’s version of ‘My Funny Valentine’. She sang this song for her Britain’s Got Talent 2013 audition and got in. She went on to do really well in the show and was dubbed ‘Britain’s sexiest singer’.

So what did she do that made her version of this song sound so saucy? Well you’ll find out all the techniques she used in the video below.

Enjoy!

Nicola xx

NOTE: I originally recorded this vid with really awesome sound quality (hence the mic,) but my computer died and I lost the audio unfortunately. So this version just has the sound coming from the camera, but I thought it was still clear enough so you could hear all the nuances of the singing technique, so I uploaded this version now instead of making you wait until I redid it.

Here’s the original video of Alice singing: 

Video Summary

Step 1 – The Cry.

Adding a little cry to the start of your notes adds a sense of drama, melancholy and sexiness and Alice uses these throughout her singing.

Step 2 – Leave Space.

Music is about what you leave out. Space. You do not have to sing and fill up the whole song with long note holds. Get comfortable leaving big long spaces in your music.

Step 3 – Add big slide downs.

For some reason downward slides are generally sexier than upward slides… maybe its because you’re going down low… (lol)

Step 4 – Add bedroom noises!! (Seriously)

You might think this is pretty funny, but Alice does this twice in her performance. Not one bedroom noise but TWO bedroom noises! She adds a little Ahhh at 2:58 ‘Is your mouth a little weak…Ahhh’. Which automatically makes people get the vibe she’s putting off its kind of like the icing on the cake with a sexy cherry on top.

Have a go with these techniques and let me know if you used them in any of your songs!

Nicola x

 

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